Palghat T.S. Mani Iyer

Carnatic Musicians
meena
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Postby meena » 22 Mar 2007, 19:26

Deleted
Last edited by meena on 05 May 2008, 23:15, edited 1 time in total.

ravi2006
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Postby ravi2006 » 24 Mar 2007, 18:57

A tani avartanam by Palghat Mani Iyer from a KVN concert in Edinburgh, 1963:

http://www.badongo.com/file/2558775

Sri Mani Iyer is accompanied by another mridangam player; I'm not sure who he is (C.S. Murugabhoopathy perhaps?) - anyway, listen to the 2 of them having a gripping exchange in misra gati during the tani.

PS: A question for experienced uploaders. I have only just started transferring music from cassettes to my PC and have noticed each audio file is taking up an excessive number of Megabytes compared to similar-length tracks that other people have uploaded. I am using 'Instant Music' by ADStech and Nero SoundTrax to convert from cassettes to .WAV files. What do other members use? Is there any way of cutting down on the space taken up?

PPS: If I can solve this problem I should be able to upload the whole of KVN's Sankarabharanam + tani

sankirnam
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Postby sankirnam » 24 Mar 2007, 22:13

That Edinburgh concert was double mrudangam with PMI and his son, Palghat T. R. Rajamani.

sankirnam
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Postby sankirnam » 24 Mar 2007, 22:15

and yes, to reduce space, make sure you are also converting the files to mp3 or some other compressed or "lossy" format. Mp3 is the most popular choice, and for most Carnatic recordings, 128 kbps is sufficient quality.

sankirnam
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Postby sankirnam » 24 Mar 2007, 22:18

Here is a thani of PMI from a concert in Ragasudha in 1981 with Ramani and TNK. Not sure if SV Krishnan had moved to Chennai then or if it was still in Coimbatore.
This thani shows why Mani Iyer was both feared and respected for his nadham. He begins the thani improvising on the line of swaram that Ramani plays, and later he delves into some complex kannaku (you can hear everyone struggling to put thalam).

http://rapidshare.com/files/22615459/Thani__1.mp3.html

pgaiyar
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Postby pgaiyar » 25 Mar 2007, 10:55

Message for Ravi 2006:

Dear Sir. Kindly upload again as the thani of PMI+ TR Rajamani(Edinburgh) file is deactivated. God bless you.

Regards

P. G. Aiyar (pgaiyar@yahoo.com)

ravi2006
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Postby ravi2006 » 25 Mar 2007, 14:17

Here is KVN's Swara Raga followed by the tani, in a more compact form this time:

http://www.badongo.com/file/2565993

Sankirnam, thanks for the tip.

mahesh33
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Postby mahesh33 » 25 Mar 2007, 19:39

Sankirnam

I am not convinced that the thani is indeed PMI's..most likely it is Guru Sri Karaikudi Mani.

sankirnam
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Postby sankirnam » 25 Mar 2007, 19:48

It is indeed Palghat Mani Iyer.. the korvai he plays starting at 4:37 is his own, I have only heard him play that. Similarly, the mohara he plays at the end is a classic Thanjavur school mohara, which I have never heard KRM sir play.
KRM sir also plays kappi mrudangam, just like Palghat Mani Iyer, but only PMI has this kind of tone in his mrudangam.
I can tell KRM and PMI apart easily, and this is definetely Palghat Mani Iyer.

ignoramus
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Postby ignoramus » 26 Mar 2007, 04:52

hi sankirnam

would like to have your contact detail if you dont mind. my email id is kann14@yahoo.com. Just wanted to discuss one or two things with you.

completelyclueless
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Postby completelyclueless » 26 Mar 2007, 07:09

i just listened to the clip...how can this be anybody other than the great mani iyer?

pgaiyar
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Postby pgaiyar » 27 Mar 2007, 13:07

To : Ravi2006 : Many thanks, Sir for the repeat uplaod. God bless you.

Regards

P. G. Aiyar

drshrikaanth
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Postby drshrikaanth » 20 Apr 2007, 09:00

Rajamani, son of Palghat Mani Iyer reminisces about his father and laya (But two different names for the same thing!) and reflects on current trends in this article in the Hindu.

Setting the rhythm

RAKSHITH M.R.

Much of the credit for the mridanga's current status must go to Palghat Mani Iyer, reminisces his son and disciple, Palghat T.S. Rajamani

TITANIC PRESENCE Rajamani humbly concedes

If rhythm occupies a central place in the scheme of Carnatic music, some of the credit must go to the legendary mridangam maestro Palghat Mani Iyer . It was through Mani Iyer's remarkable adeptness at accompaniment that the mridanga went from being a mere marker of time into an indispensable component of any musical rendering. The new language of percussion introduced by him established the mridanga in the foreground of Carnatic music and enabled percussion to evolve into a complex art.

Mani Iyer's disciple and son Palghat T.S. Rajamani is a repository of the rhythmic knowledge embodied in Mani Iyer's school of playing. His initiation to mridanga was natural as its sound literally filled the air in his home. The training happened in an informal ambience without the notion of a class at a fixed hour. A major part of Rajamani's learning happened when Mani Iyer used to give advanced lessons to senior disciples. On occasion, Mani Iyer would ask K.V. Narayanaswamy — who used to stay with him those days — to sing and his own illustrious disciple Palghat Raghu to accompany him on the mridangam. And Mani Iyer would guide them on the khanjira.

Mani Iyer encouraged his son to play for bhajans as it infused him with ideas and helped achieve finger dexterity. When the new concept of double mridanga begin to be experimented with, Mani Iyer would literally lead Rajamani on the stage and expose him to the intricacies of accompaniment. This was the phase when manodharma (creativity of the individual) evolved. Rajamani recollects that before concerts his father would tutor him on what to play and where to effect a change of pattern. If Rajamani followed the instruction mechanically Mani Iyer would shout at him for not having observed the effect the particular nadai (rhythmic movement) had on the audience.

It had to be played for longer time when the audience was savouring its delight, he would argue, and not be changed just to mechanically conform to a pre-planned scheme of playing. In the next concert if Rajamani did so, he would then be reprimanded for not being innovative. The fine elements that go into accompaniment like grasping the rhythmic movement of the main performer, the points at which one must be innovative, the moments when one should pause, and the intuition to judge the pulse of the audience could be imbibed only in a live culture of performance.

Mani Iyer's art, remarks Rajamani, gained profundity because of his intimate knowledge of the songs being rendered. This, coupled with his extraordinary presence of mind, resulted in a rich rhythmic text that raised the aesthetics of the musical composition to great heights.


Mani Iyer's (accompanying legendary vocalist Ariyakudi Ramanuja Iyengar) art and persona are so towering that he never imagined meddling with it

The manner in which he changed his style of accompaniment for the same song rendered by different musicians made one wonder at the infinite possibilities of the mridangam. The typical rhythmic phrases he played for "Yendudi Vedalithi" sung by Alathur Brothers or the tisra nadai (three syllables for a beat) he introduced in "Amba Kamakshi" presented by Semmangudi, for example, are etched in the memory of connoisseurs. It is no exaggeration if one said that the listeners would forget the song and be enraptured by the mridangam accompaniment.

Mani Iyer always violated his own statement that the percussion interlude should not go on for more than six to eight minutes. He clarified that if the percussionists had the power to captivate the audience in rapture, time would no longer be a criterion. Mani Iyer acknowledged that while trying to give a new dimension to his art he drew artistic elements from practitioners of instruments such as the thavil, chandai, thayambakam, and remodelled them to blend coherently with conventional patterns of mridangam and effected a structural and creative transformation.

Some critics observe that the exigent task of establishing the mridangam in the forefront of Carnatic music compelled Mani Iyer to come out with raging and massive sound arrays that seem wild and raw. The next stage of evolution required refinement and order. Rajamani humbly concedes that Mani Iyer's art and persona are so towering that he never imagined meddling with it.

Rajamani comments that these days even youngsters play complicated mathematical combinations since they are exposed to a lot of music and have many facilities, but their playing lacks depth, rigour and restraint, especially in accompaniment.

He feels that this kind of growth is not desirable for the evolution of the art. The other challenge comes from main performers who prefer monotonous, insipid sarvalaghu accompaniment that does not demand them to come out with equally competent musical phrases. Rajamani feels that mridanga practitioners of the present generation must confront this crisis with greater involvement in the art and strive for retaining mridangam's reputation as an evolved percussion instrument.

http://www.hindu.com/fr/2007/04/20/stor ... 000300.htm

sbala
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Postby sbala » 20 Apr 2007, 17:55

Is TS Rajamani Sir a vocalist as well? I heard in one concert of Palghat Ramprasad that his guru was his father Rajamani Sir.

rshankar
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Postby rshankar » 20 Apr 2007, 19:18

http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/fr/200 … 000300.htm

Thanks Rajesh for pointing out my goof up! :)

meena
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Postby meena » 20 Apr 2007, 19:26

shankar

cannot access the link :(

Suji Ram
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Postby Suji Ram » 20 Apr 2007, 19:28

meena wrote:shankar

cannot access the link :(

http://rasikas.org/viewtopic.php?id=2598

You can open here. :)

rshankar
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Postby rshankar » 20 Apr 2007, 19:35

DRS has posted the same!

meena
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Postby meena » 20 Apr 2007, 19:44

thanks suji/shankar

sshankar_1970
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Postby sshankar_1970 » 22 Oct 2007, 08:15

Has PMI ever played alongwith G Harishankar (Kanjira) or with T.H.Vinayakaram (gHATAM)? Are there any recordings?

mohan
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Postby mohan » 18 Nov 2007, 23:22

Does someone have the text of the speech that Sri Palghat Mani Iyer gave when he was conferred the Sangeetha Kalanidhi title?

srkris
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Postby srkris » 19 Nov 2007, 07:28

sshankar_1970 wrote:Has PMI ever played alongwith G Harishankar (Kanjira) or with T.H.Vinayakaram (gHATAM)? Are there any recordings?

I think he has played with both. I will confirm this shortly.

thathwamasi
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Postby thathwamasi » 19 Nov 2007, 09:32

PMI has played definitely with both Vikku and Harishankar. Infact he was one of Harishankar's gurus. He played quite a few concerts with Harishankar for MLV.

Now clarifying a previous post's question : Rajamani mama is PMI's first son who is a Mridangist, who accompanied PMI in Edinburgh and many other concerts. He is a giant in Layam. There is a famous story of PMI losing a bet for Rajamani Mama in a laya related problem. Shri Rajaram is his last son and he is the Father and Guru of Shri Palghat R.Ramprasad. Hope that clarifies it.

T

srkris
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Postby srkris » 20 Nov 2007, 07:50

thathwamasi wrote:Rajamani mama is PMI's first son who is a Mridangist, who accompanied PMI in Edinburgh and many other concerts. He is a giant in Layam. There is a famous story of PMI losing a bet for Rajamani Mama in a laya related problem.

There is no doubt on his giant status... but please update us on this famous story. Thanks. :)

thathwamasi
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Postby thathwamasi » 21 Nov 2007, 14:52

Here is the famous story : There are many versions of it. The one I am writing was told to me by Rajamani Mama himself so we can get a level of comfort about the authenticity.

Rajamani Mama was a college student then. And was brilliant with layam, mathematics and mridangam as ever. Once he was engaged in a heated arguement with PMI about keeping two different taalams at the same time. As in, one taalam in one hand. There is no challenge when you blindly try that we some random combination like Rupakam in one hand and Adi in other.

So PMI put forth this challenge. Rajamani mama must recite Korvais with two taalams in two hands. The talams chosen were, Adi talam Misra Nadai and Kanda jaathi ata talam chathusra nadai. (this was chosen because of its brilliance. Adi talam misra nadai is 56 mathrais(7counts * 8 beats) and Kanda Jaathi Ata thaalam chathusra nadai is also 56 maathrais (4 counts * 14 beats. K.Ata thalam is the same taalam of bhairavi varnam just in case if its confusing.) So both there taalams will be co-inciding at the samam of every round.) It is a haunting task to do. The stakes were as follows. If Rajamani Mama does it, then PMI will play concerts for 6 months with a kudumi. If he fails, then he has to attend his college for six months wearing a dhoti. And Rajamani mama thought very logically and deviced a simple practicing technique, practised and sucessfully defeated PMI in this bet. And PMI did oblige by having a kudumi for sometime.


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